Login Form



Visitors Counter


Home Classical Music Sarangi - Gosai Ram & Ganga Ram

Gosai Ram - Sarangi

Classical and Folk music

Gosai Ram:  Sarangi

Ganga Ram:  Tabla gosairam

One afternoon in the early 1980s, while walking home from Almora after shopping for provisions, I heard the sound of a strange musical instrument coming from a tiny dark lean-to by the path to Kasar Devi, in Narain Tiwari Diwar (NTD), near Almora. Curious, I followed the sound, stooping to enter what was a cobbler's workshop and saw a small man sitting cross-legged playing a stringed instrument which, I discovered, was a sarangi. The musician was Gosai Ram and I stayed and listened to him playing this wonderful instrument for an hour or so and from then on, whenever I passed that way and heard the sound of the sarangi, I would sit a while and enjoy the music. Gosai Ram's son Anand says their family came originally from Vasoon village, near Ranikhet before they settled in NTD some generations ago. The family was certainly musical; an elderly villager remembered them coming to his village several times with a programme of song and dance and a villager from Falsima recalled that his father had given Gosai Ram a tabla long ago. The sarangi has been in the family for several generations but its origin is obscure. Gosai Ram played at the Ram Lilas in Narain Tiwari Diwar for many years but also at other places on occasion. (any further information would be most welcome).
The recording was made in September 1983 in Gosai Ram's home in Narain Tiwari Diwar. Ganga Ram, a cobbler and relative from Nainital, accompanied on tabla.

The Sarangi

The Sarangi consists of squat, truncated body. Like the Sarod it has a sound board of goat skin. It has three main playing strings of heavy gut. These are the ones which are bowed. It also has an additional 30-40 metal sympathic strings, which give the instrument it characteristic sound.
Unlike the violin, in which the strings are pressed down on a fingerboard,the playing strings of the sarangi are stopped with fingernails of the left hand.
Its name is widely believed to mean "a hundred colours" indicating its adaptability to a wide range of musical styles, its flexible tunability, and its ability to produce a large palette of tonal colour and emotional nuance. The sarangi is revered for its uncanny capacity to imitate the timbre and inflections of the human voice as well as for the intensity of emotional expression to which it lends itself. In the words of Sir Yehudi Menuhin: "The sarangi remains not only the authentic and original Indian bowed stringed instrument but the one which... expresses the very soul of Indian feeling and thought."

From: http://www.chembur.com/instruments/sarangi/sarangi.htm

The recordings presented here are Copyright © 2011 Anand Ram/Ian Coulthard,  ℗ 2011 Anand Ram/Ian Coulthard. They may be downloaded for personal use only. Any unauthorised broadcasting, public performance, copying or re-recording will constitute an infringement of copyright.

tulips4    

1) Tin Tal Ghaat
download
 
 tulips5
 
2) Deepak Raaga
download
 tulips6
3) Raaga Kaphi???
download
 tulips4

 

4) Sarang ki Jeeja

 

download
 tulips5

 

5) Pahari Ganna

 

download
 tulips6

 

6) Bhajan

 

download
 tulips4

 

7) Gorkha Ganna

 

download
 tulips5

 

8) Pukswa ko Jali hai, ne ko Jainti ne ko Danna???

 

download
 tulips6

 

9) Deshi Charpai

 

download
 tulips4

 

10) Sargham

 

download
 tulips5

 

11) Satish Ram???

 

download
 tulips6

 

12) Ayai Murai Mandir???

 

download
 tulips4

 

13) Durga Ghat

 

download
 tulips5

 

14) Kumaoni Ganna

 

download
 tulips6